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Orchard Vs Timothy Grass


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#1 Rohara Justification

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Posted 07 September 2006 - 04:10 PM

is there a difference? is the orchard just grass hay with timothy mixed in?
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#2 PeterC

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Posted 07 September 2006 - 04:23 PM

QUOTE(Rohara Justification @ Sep 7 2006, 04:10 PM) View Post

is there a difference? is the orchard just grass hay with timothy mixed in?


No those are two distinct types of grass. Most pasture mixes in our area would contain both, as would most hay mixtures that were grass/alfalfa.
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#3 Guest_CoolSkkyFarm_*

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Posted 07 September 2006 - 04:40 PM

It depends on where you live as to what is "orchard" grass vs "timothy". In California they are 2 distinct types of grass hay, & the timothy is always more expensive, but is more nutritious than plain "orchard", etc., at least that is what I've been told.

#4 Roze

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Posted 07 September 2006 - 04:43 PM

Timothy hay is a seed hay. It is more coarse and has a lower nutritional value than other hays. I know that they recommend feeding this to foundered horses, less sugar. I believe that orchard is a type of meadow grass and would be higher in nutrients and sugar.
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#5 Rideem

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Posted 07 September 2006 - 11:03 PM

Both Orchard and Timothy are cool season grasses, as such they are high in sugar but lower than other grasses in protein. Orchard grass is a clump grass in that it grows in clumps where grasses like fescue do not grow in clumps. Both are grown from seed. Like most types of grasses it is fairly easy to identify orchard and timothy by their seed heads. Timothy being more "barrel like" in appearance where as orchard grass seed heads are more like a well shaped tree. Fescue type grasses are more like sparse trees.

Here is a good site for identifiing cool season grasses and finding out information about them:

http://www.uwex.edu/...age/Grasses.htm

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#6 Rohara Justification

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Posted 07 September 2006 - 11:53 PM

we feed the orchard grass at the barn i work at to all of the horses that have feet issues. we dont feed bermuda cause we were told that it can cause colic.
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#7 Rideem

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Posted 08 September 2006 - 09:35 AM

Hi,
I feed bermuda hay, in fact, that is what my hay field is. What I have found is that bermuda is a much finer bladed grass, i.e., it is less coarse and that some of the horses eat it much faster than they will other hays. That could be one of the problems. I did have one horse that had a problem with it. We wet the hay and he was fine. We believe we solved the problem with him when the new wormers came out that reduced tape worms, we wormed him and found that he no longer had a problem.

We have tried this experiment: putting out both bermuda and a timothy/orchard grass hay. We noticed that the bermuda was eaten first. In fact, we have one older horse (29 years old) that will waste most of his hay if it is anything but bermuda. He is a real picky eater.

Since I live in Tennessee, the bermuda does better in the hotter, dryer weather. Cool season grasses do much better in the North. I don't believe that bermuda grows further North than Southern Kentucky. However, with global warming, bermuda may be the grass of choice in the future. FA214.gif

I think you use whatever you are comfortable with and what works for you.

Frank

#8 sweetwaterarabians

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Posted 08 September 2006 - 02:23 PM

I too am choosing to go with Bermuda again this year. The bermuda hay we got last year was excellent and it's so hard to find quality hay around here where the hay grower actually takes care of his pastures. I had one mare that had a problem with it last year so we are also getting some fescue/orchardgrass mix for her to eat with her Bermuda. I had given them one fescue/orchardgrass round bale last year when we ran out of hay until we could get more Bermuda and for some reason she seemed to like the round bale better and it was not the quality of the Bermuda. Just her preferrance I guess. Maybe she was eating her Bermuda too fast last year which caused a couple of colic episodes. The other horses did great on it.
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#9 DreamKeeper

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Posted 08 September 2006 - 05:59 PM

I wish you guys luck with the bermuda hay. I know its beautiful, smells great and the horses love it, but I have had nothing but problems with bermuda hay. It took several colic surgerys before I realized it was the hay. My vet says its not if, but when it going to happen. I feel like part of the problem is like another poster said, it is fine and the horses eat it much faster that coarser hay and maybe that's why it causes impactions. I love timothy or orchard grass, but it has to be shipped into our area and is almost as expensive as alfalfa. I feed a bahia hay, which is not as fine, or pretty as bermuda, but the horses have done well with it. I know many people who feed bermuda grass and have not had the problems I have had, but I just won't chance it.

#10 Rohara Justification

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Posted 09 September 2006 - 12:02 PM

QUOTE(DreamKeeper @ Sep 8 2006, 05:59 PM) View Post

I wish you guys luck with the bermuda hay. I know its beautiful, smells great and the horses love it, but I have had nothing but problems with bermuda hay. It took several colic surgerys before I realized it was the hay. My vet says its not if, but when it going to happen. I feel like part of the problem is like another poster said, it is fine and the horses eat it much faster that coarser hay and maybe that's why it causes impactions. I love timothy or orchard grass, but it has to be shipped into our area and is almost as expensive as alfalfa. I feed a bahia hay, which is not as fine, or pretty as bermuda, but the horses have done well with it. I know many people who feed bermuda grass and have not had the problems I have had, but I just won't chance it.



that is the reason why we dont use the bermuda at our barn. honestly my horse loves the orchard grass. i just didnt know if there was a difference between the two grasses ( tim vs orch). i am a little new to the ins and outs of feeding grass hay. havent done much homework on all the different types. we have alot of older horses at the barn that have feet issues so i am just know getting more familar with all of the differnet types.
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#11 Aztecnitemare

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Posted 10 September 2006 - 03:36 AM

I live in bermuda country, or as they call it here coastal. I feed alfalfa, timothy, or prarie grass. UNfortunately coastal is finer stemmed and as my vets say. Coastal (bermuda) keeps em in business (as in colic).
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#12 rosewood

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Posted 10 September 2006 - 09:11 AM

QUOTE(Aztecnitemare @ Sep 10 2006, 01:36 AM) View Post

I live in bermuda country, or as they call it here coastal. I feed alfalfa, timothy, or prarie grass. UNfortunately coastal is finer stemmed and as my vets say. Coastal (bermuda) keeps em in business (as in colic).


Most vets here in southern california also say do not feed bermuda hay. Colic waiting to happen.

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#13 Dick

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Posted 10 September 2006 - 11:56 AM

QUOTE
I live in bermuda country, or as they call it here coastal.


Coastal bermuda is one of the variants of bermuda. It is a very tough pasture grass and slightly heavier stemmed than common bermuda. Coastal is a nutrious and high quality hay but it is fine bladed and is prone to ball up in the gut which is why it causes colic.

If you feed coastal it is very important that you keep your horses teeth in excellent shape so they can chew the hay effectively. This will greatly reduce the chances of colic.

Because of the drought here in North Texas we have been forced to import hay from Kansas. We have been getting brome hay. It is broad leaved hay. The horses really like it and they are keeping in excellent condition with it.

We will hate to switch back to coastal because of the difference in colic threat between the two hays but local coastal costs much less when it is available.
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#14 Platinum Jeweler

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Posted 10 September 2006 - 12:09 PM

QUOTE(Rohara Justification @ Sep 7 2006, 05:10 PM) View Post

is there a difference? is the orchard just grass hay with timothy mixed in?


We have a mix of orchard and timothy. The orchard grass matures more quickly and is difficult to get at its prime due to weather, otherwise it makes a quality feed. Normally in our area (W. Pa.) the orchard grass is past prime and timothy is just maturing. I'm glad i'm not a farmer for a living, depending on mother nature drives me nuts.

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#15 Rohara Justification

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Posted 10 September 2006 - 04:32 PM

i would love to find an orchard/tim mix out here (so cal). i havent really looked into it but i dont remember ever seeing it at the feed store
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#16 nationalvelvet

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Posted 16 September 2006 - 09:33 PM

When I was boarding my mare in Florida she kept colicking while being fed coastal (bermuda hay), once I switched her to timothy, she was fine. My vet said horses would most colic on coastal because it is less stemmy and more prone to balling up . Unfortuneately, coastal sells for 6.00 a bale at my feed store and Timothy around twice that. A small cost increase when you factor in the colic surgeries...

#17 Su Valley

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Posted 16 September 2006 - 10:05 PM

There are differences in all grass hays...you can learn about them at the safergrass website.

I swear I have never heard of hay "balling up" after being ingested before....now I am off on another learning curve!




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