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Choke After Care Help?


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#1 arabbossmare

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Posted 13 April 2007 - 10:15 PM

2 year old filly choked on her grain early this morning. I almost didn't catch it. Her entire pipe was full except for six inches!!! WE nearly lost the girl. After the impaction was cleared we gave her rest and water only. She bled a good bit. But she is no longer in dire straights. I know the reason of the choke was due to bolting her feed and her teeth need to be floated. But, I am concerned about her feeding right now. I am thinking of beet pulp for a short while and senior feed and make sure it is a gruel mash texture. I really don't want her to have any inflamation. We are keeping her on banamine for a while. Do you think I need to follow up with some antibiotics to help any possibility of infection from the constant working to get her helped out?
THOUGHTS?
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#2 mmfarabian

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Posted 13 April 2007 - 10:27 PM

QUOTE(arabbossmare @ Apr 13 2007, 11:15 PM) View Post
2 year old filly choked on her grain early this morning. I almost didn't catch it. Her entire pipe was full except for six inches!!! WE nearly lost the girl. After the impaction was cleared we gave her rest and water only. She bled a good bit. But she is no longer in dire straights. I know the reason of the choke was due to bolting her feed and her teeth need to be floated. But, I am concerned about her feeding right now. I am thinking of beet pulp for a short while and senior feed and make sure it is a gruel mash texture. I really don't want her to have any inflamation. We are keeping her on banamine for a while. Do you think I need to follow up with some antibiotics to help any possibility of infection from the constant working to get her helped out?
THOUGHTS?

Sorry to hear about your filly. I'm glad you caught it in time! I would do exactly what you are doing, I would also add a chunk of salt to her feed bucket, so she has to work harder for her feed. Good luck!
Cathy

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#3 MPH

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Posted 13 April 2007 - 10:41 PM

I agree, but I would talk to your vet about putting her on some SMZs as well. I think I remember a few yrs back with a horse we had choke, we put on SMZs. Good luck!!
Beauty is as beauty does!

#4 Slippery Silk

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Posted 13 April 2007 - 11:30 PM

QUOTE(arabbossmare @ Apr 13 2007, 10:15 PM) View Post
2 year old filly choked on her grain early this morning. I almost didn't catch it. Her entire pipe was full except for six inches!!! WE nearly lost the girl. After the impaction was cleared we gave her rest and water only. She bled a good bit. But she is no longer in dire straights. I know the reason of the choke was due to bolting her feed and her teeth need to be floated. But, I am concerned about her feeding right now. I am thinking of beet pulp for a short while and senior feed and make sure it is a gruel mash texture. I really don't want her to have any inflamation. We are keeping her on banamine for a while. Do you think I need to follow up with some antibiotics to help any possibility of infection from the constant working to get her helped out?
THOUGHTS?


Something is causing her to feel anxiety about her feed. She feels somebody is going to take it from her or if she finishes fast she can get somebody elses. Thats horse logic.
I would pull her off feed and keep a good quality hay in front of her at all times. Believe it or not with good hay in ample supply you never need to grain: the young ones grow off great and colic incidences become extremely rare.
She can not swallow hay with out chewing while she can slam feed down.
The feed if given will have to be a wet almost sloppy mixture.
She is also going to drop all of a hundred pounds of weight or better with each episode.
It is a repeat behavior until her fear about losing her feed stops.
Good luck I know how awful it is to watch a horse choke.

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Posted 13 April 2007 - 11:31 PM

The mash is good especially since she will have a sore throat for a few days. might want to try putting a brick in her bucket to keep her from bolting her feed so much. So glad you were there to catch her.

#6 arabbossmare

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Posted 13 April 2007 - 11:51 PM

QUOTE(Slippery Silk @ Apr 13 2007, 11:30 PM) View Post
Something is causing her to feel anxiety about her feed. She feels somebody is going to take it from her or if she finishes fast she can get somebody elses. Thats horse logic.
I would pull her off feed and keep a good quality hay in front of her at all times. Believe it or not with good hay in ample supply you never need to grain: the young ones grow off great and colic incidences become extremely rare.
She can not swallow hay with out chewing while she can slam feed down.
The feed if given will have to be a wet almost sloppy mixture.
She is also going to drop all of a hundred pounds of weight or better with each episode.
It is a repeat behavior until her fear about losing her feed stops.
Good luck I know how awful it is to watch a horse choke.

actually its because her teeth are not properly aligned. We are going to get them floated next week. It is the main reason she has been thin even after the pancur purge 2 weeks ago. Usually a wormy horse after getting the purge will quickly gain weight. So her teeth were not digesting her food. She was pretty much just swallowing it even with chewing it. Poor girl. Hubby said she was in a grouchy mood because she isn't allowed feed today. She needs to heal a little bit over night and begin mash feeding tomorrow.
Ahhh praise the Beet Pulp goddesses!!!

Thanks for the SMZ tips...will go get some!
Carla
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"OH LOOK HONEY ITS A UKELELE" Woman pointing to a ten thousand dollar signature series mandolin at the Gibson Store in Oprymills.


"why don't we have horses named after the cheap drinks? Mad Dog 20/20, Ripple, pabst blue ribbon, or maybe kool aide or sams choice??"

#7 Reinier Arabians

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Posted 13 April 2007 - 11:56 PM

I had a vet tell me once to put several larger rocks in the feed bunk. I keep a salt block in each horses stall in the feed bunk that way they have to move it around to get to their feed.

My gelding, now 33, choked a few years ago but we were lucky, we were standing with him when it happened and it was a small enough amount he was able to cough it up (through his mouth and nose) while we rubbed his neck. He now gets a mash (senior, flax, and beet pulp), but his choke wasn't because of eating too fast it was because he didn't have any back teeth so he was unable to chew his food well enough.

Good luck with your girl and I hope she feels better soon, I know how scary it is to see them hurting (((((hugs))))) to you and her.

Jacinta

#8 Cheryl L

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Posted 14 April 2007 - 08:39 AM

Poor baby.
I also strongly recommend antibiotics with the SMZ and a good probiotic. A lot of times they will develope a secondary bacterial infection, after choke. Friends horse choked and the vet (I don't like him) said the SMZ and antibiotics were not necessary. I told them to do it anyway and they chose not to. Well the horse developed a secondary bacterial infection, no big surprise, and lost a TON of weight. It took them 2 months before he started to look decent.
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#9 clipclopalong

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Posted 14 April 2007 - 09:41 AM

QUOTE(arabbossmare @ Apr 13 2007, 11:15 PM) View Post
2 year old filly choked on her grain early this morning. I almost didn't catch it. Her entire pipe was full except for six inches!!! WE nearly lost the girl. After the impaction was cleared we gave her rest and water only. She bled a good bit. But she is no longer in dire straights. I know the reason of the choke was due to bolting her feed and her teeth need to be floated. But, I am concerned about her feeding right now. I am thinking of beet pulp for a short while and senior feed and make sure it is a gruel mash texture. I really don't want her to have any inflamation. We are keeping her on banamine for a while. Do you think I need to follow up with some antibiotics to help any possibility of infection from the constant working to get her helped out?
THOUGHTS?


I always fed hay 1/2 an hour before I grained my horses. This took the edge off their appetite so they weren't as likely to bolt their grain. I board now and I don't have control over how my horses are fed. This farm also feeds less hay than I do and all my horses have started the feed anxiety thing and the bolting of their grain. I really hate it but if I don't like it bad enough I have to move them and there is no place to go here for me. Try haying first and see if that doesn't help a little. Even just a flake 1/2 an hour before can make a difference.


#10 Slippery Silk

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Posted 14 April 2007 - 10:50 AM

QUOTE(Slippery Silk @ Apr 13 2007, 11:30 PM) View Post
Something is causing her to feel anxiety about her feed. She feels somebody is going to take it from her or if she finishes fast she can get somebody elses. Thats horse logic.
I would pull her off feed and keep a good quality hay in front of her at all times. Believe it or not with good hay in ample supply you never need to grain: the young ones grow off great and colic incidences become extremely rare.
She can not swallow hay with out chewing while she can slam feed down.
The feed if given will have to be a wet almost sloppy mixture.
She is also going to drop all of a hundred pounds of weight or better with each episode.
It is a repeat behavior until her fear about losing her feed stops.
Good luck I know how awful it is to watch a horse choke.


Antibiotic follow ups is a good precaution, just take comfort in the knowledge tha oral mucus membranes heal at a very rapid rate.
I have a 32 year old mare who has only a few molars left.
I keep her looking great and her energy levels up with Senior Pellets, the pellets don't take much chewing . To help matters as a plus I give Camille nearly a 1/4 cup of corn oil added on top her pellets. Those extra calories are exactly what she needs to enjoy her life. She grazes all the time and chews on her haybut only swallows the juice then spits out the big wads .
Hey ol grandma has the right to be quirky at her age. She loves me when I give her carrots from the blender!
Why I am telling you this is until everything is going good with her teeth it is easy to slip the filly the extra calories she needs.


#11 Julie

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Posted 14 April 2007 - 11:23 PM

We have a mare that has choked, the first time was the evening I got married! We stopped at home to pick up our change of clothes and there she stood with my girlfriend fretting over her. We stayed and walked her for 3 hours and she came along fine. The second time was our 4th Anniversary! She cleared up on her own again (with us hanging over her). The last time we had the vet out. The vet had trouble clearing her, said she probably has a little scar tissue down there that is a natural seat for the plug to settle. He also said it would be alot harder every time. We have soaked her feed ever since, she gets beet pulp and grain with some alfalfa pellets in a big mash with her local hay and she does just fine. We have a big sign on her stall "NO DRY PELLETS" with a Mr. Yuck sticker :-) She is an eager eater so I guess that is part of the profile.

#12 usedtobeqh

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Posted 15 April 2007 - 01:34 AM

We have an older mare that chokes on Senior pellets, even as soft and small as they are. Part of her problem is ulcers. We keep her on an inexpensive ulcer guard product and have a large salt brick to help her slow down at feeding time.

So far we have been able to prevent further choke.

Bonnie

#13 Salila

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Posted 15 April 2007 - 04:29 AM

Feeding soaked hay is really helpful - having dealt with a couple of partial chokers. If possible, wrap her hay ration in a wet potato sack (do you have burlap/hessian bags?) then give the whole thing a really good high pressure hosing. Leave it to soak for an hour or two - really softens the grass stalks - THEN put the soaked hay into a hay net. It is really hard for a horse to bolt their feed when they have to work it out of a net.

I always feed 'chokers' their hard feed very damp too - not 'lay the dust' damp, but 'the bottom of the bucket is really wet' damp. Then, when the feed is dumped into their feeder, the REALLY wet stuff is on top.

One of my mares goes at every bucket feed as though it's her last. She spent 12 months struggling for every mouthful and nearly starved to death as a young mare when she was abandonned alone in a huge paddock. I've had her for over 20 years - and she STILL goes for the first mouthfuls like one of those machines that has the big biting mouth-thing that shovels up tons of dirt, despite living on pasture 24/7!

#14 Shear d-Lite

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Posted 15 April 2007 - 06:58 AM

QUOTE(arabbossmare @ Apr 13 2007, 11:15 PM) View Post
2 year old filly choked on her grain early this morning. I almost didn't catch it. Her entire pipe was full except for six inches!!! WE nearly lost the girl. After the impaction was cleared we gave her rest and water only. She bled a good bit. But she is no longer in dire straights. I know the reason of the choke was due to bolting her feed and her teeth need to be floated. But, I am concerned about her feeding right now. I am thinking of beet pulp for a short while and senior feed and make sure it is a gruel mash texture. I really don't want her to have any inflamation. We are keeping her on banamine for a while. Do you think I need to follow up with some antibiotics to help any possibility of infection from the constant working to get her helped out?
THOUGHTS?

I had a 2 year old filly who did the same thing. She choked because she bolted her food. At the time she was on junior feed. The vet came and cleared the impaction, and I asked him how we should feed her over the next few days. She was on wet hay and supplements for about a week. After that we gradually introduced the grain back and fed her small meals throughout the day. First week six times a day, next 5 etc.

Good luck. This mare is now 6 and doing very well.

Pam
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#15 clipclopalong

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Posted 15 April 2007 - 07:34 AM

I hate the way my NSH gelding eats his grain. I have been thinking about inventing an automatic feeder that only gives out a few kernals at a time. Now wouldn't that just frost his socks! It would work for all these horses that bolt their feed. It would have to have an auger system that moved very slowly. Similar to a pellet stove actually. Any mechanical wizards out there?

#16 SilverShadow

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Posted 15 April 2007 - 11:09 AM

What is smz?

I recall my vet joking me that with choke, its often a race to see if you can arrive at the vets before it over. - of all of my trips to the vet riding gunshot, I know I never again want to experiance the speed that night in which my husband traveled to get us there.

He gave our boy got a shot of some sort of anti-inflamitory afterwards to help prevent muscle response issues in cases of future choke, and we just kept monitering his temperature to ensure he didn't aspirate enough to develop an infection.

good luck with your filly arabbossmare,

Raye Anne




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